“The so-called 'Left-Hand Path' - that of Kaulas, Siddhas and Viras - combines the... Tantric worldview with a doctrine of the Übermensch which would put Nietzsche to shame... The Vira - which is to say: the 'heroic' man of Tantrism - seeks to sever all bonds, to overcome all duality between good and evil, honor and shame, virtue and guilt. Tantrism is the supreme path of the absolute absence of law - of shvecchacarī, a word meaning 'he whose law is his own will'." ― Julius Evola, The Path of Cinnabar.

“It is necessary to have “watchers” at hand who will bear witness to the values of Tradition in ever more uncompromising and firm ways, as the anti-traditional forces grow in strength. Even though these values cannot be achieved, it does not mean that they amount to mere “ideas.” These are measures…. Let people of our time talk about these things with condescension as if they were anachronistic and anti-historical; we know that this is an alibi for their defeat. Let us leave modern men to their “truths” and let us only be concerned about one thing: to keep standing amid a world of ruins.” ― Julius Evola, Revolt Against the Modern World: Politics, Religion, and Social Order in the Kali Yuga.

“We are born into this time and must bravely follow the path to the destined end. There is no other way. Our duty is to hold on to the lost position, without hope, without rescue, like that Roman soldier whose bones were found in front of a door in Pompeii, who died at his post during the eruption of Vesuvius because someone forgot to relieve him. That is greatness. That is what it means to be a thoroughbred. The honorable end is the one that can not be taken from a man.” ― Oswald Spengler, Man and Technics: A Contribution to a Philosophy of Life.

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

The Devil Knows Latin

Some of his interpretation of Nietzsche is debatable, but I really like this guy's message. I especially like his take on Clint Eastwood's films.
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Mr. Kopff talked about his book The Devil Knows Latin: Why America Needs the Classical Tradition, published by Intercollegiate Studies Institute. The author argued that Latin and Greek should be basic subjects in public school education and that the absence of these languages has severed our culture from its mental infrastructure. There was no question period.

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/125188-1

3 comments:

FC said...

I agree 100%. There is simply no substitute for Latin if one is to be truly educated. The myth about modern languages, say Spanish, is that they are "useful" because they are spoken. But that's true only if you visit countries where the language is spoken. The rest of the time, it serves no purpose. I exempt the relative few learners with an interest in say, Spanish literature.
The modern myth about Latin is that it's pointless because it is a "dead" language, yet in serves as the root of over 60% of English words and knowing Latin creates a preciseness with English which is otherwise absent. Not to mention being in on the "ground floor" of Western Civilization. Plus it's the one subject which alone can tie together otherwise unrelated areas of study: the language of poets and philosophers, generals and lovers, Renaissance alchemists and Medieval theologians. Truly, "Latin is a carpet on the floor of every classroom."

FC said...

I agree 100%. There is simply no substitute for Latin if one is to be truly educated. The myth about modern languages, say Spanish, is that they are "useful" because they are spoken. But that's true only if you visit countries where the language is spoken. The rest of the time, it serves no purpose. I exempt the relative few learners with an interest in say, Spanish literature.
The modern myth about Latin is that it's pointless because it is a "dead" language, yet in serves as the root of over 60% of English words and knowing Latin creates a preciseness with English which is otherwise absent. Not to mention being in on the "ground floor" of Western Civilization. Plus it's the one subject which alone can tie together otherwise unrelated areas of study: the language of poets and philosophers, generals and lovers, Renaissance alchemists and Medieval theologians. Truly, "Latin is a carpet on the floor of every classroom."

Hadding said...

The study of Latin only conveys its full benefit when it is learned through the traditional grammar-based method. Since World War II the prevalent tendency has been to attempt to teach Latin the way modern languages are taught, through endless repetition of stock phrases until they are absorbed. This requires less conscious effort from the student but does not give the same result, in terms of mental training and fundamental competence in the language, at all. I am sure that many parents of Latin students don't realize that they are being defrauded like that.