“The so-called 'Left-Hand Path' - that of Kaulas, Siddhas and Viras - combines the... Tantric worldview with a doctrine of the Übermensch which would put Nietzsche to shame... The Vira - which is to say: the 'heroic' man of Tantrism - seeks to sever all bonds, to overcome all duality between good and evil, honor and shame, virtue and guilt. Tantrism is the supreme path of the absolute absence of law - of shvecchacarī, a word meaning 'he whose law is his own will'." ― Julius Evola, The Path of Cinnabar.

“It is necessary to have “watchers” at hand who will bear witness to the values of Tradition in ever more uncompromising and firm ways, as the anti-traditional forces grow in strength. Even though these values cannot be achieved, it does not mean that they amount to mere “ideas.” These are measures…. Let people of our time talk about these things with condescension as if they were anachronistic and anti-historical; we know that this is an alibi for their defeat. Let us leave modern men to their “truths” and let us only be concerned about one thing: to keep standing amid a world of ruins.” ― Julius Evola, Revolt Against the Modern World: Politics, Religion, and Social Order in the Kali Yuga.

“We are born into this time and must bravely follow the path to the destined end. There is no other way. Our duty is to hold on to the lost position, without hope, without rescue, like that Roman soldier whose bones were found in front of a door in Pompeii, who died at his post during the eruption of Vesuvius because someone forgot to relieve him. That is greatness. That is what it means to be a thoroughbred. The honorable end is the one that can not be taken from a man.” ― Oswald Spengler, Man and Technics: A Contribution to a Philosophy of Life.

Monday, June 15, 2009

J.R.R. TOLKIEN’S OWN COPY OF THE BOOK OF THE DEAD IN EGYPTIAN HIEROGLYPHICS, A RESEARCH SOURCE FOR LORD OF THE RINGS, EACH VOLUME SIGNED BY HIM

Another installment in our series of interesting rare books online:
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J.R.R. TOLKIEN’S OWN COPY OF THE BOOK OF THE DEAD IN EGYPTIAN HIEROGLYPHICS, A RESEARCH SOURCE FOR LORD OF THE RINGS, EACH VOLUME SIGNED BY HIM

(TOLKIEN, J.R.R.) BUDGE, E.A. Wallis. The Chapters of Coming Forth by Day or the Theban Recension of the Book of the Dead. The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Text Edited from Numerous Papyri. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner, 1910. Three volumes. Small octavo, original brown cloth; housed in a custom slipcase. $8800.

Second edition of the hieroglyphic text of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, the copy belonging to noted philologist and author J.R.R. Tolkien, with his ownership signature in each volume.

The ancient Egyptian hymns and religious texts provided in this edition “form a representative collection of the compositions which the Egyptians inscribed upon the walls of tombs, sarcophagi, coffins, stelae, amulets, etc. to ensure the well-being of their dead in the Other World. Taken together they are known generally as the Book of the Dead.” These hymns and texts were “believed to give the dead strength to resist the attacks of foes, and to withstand the powers of darkness and of the grave, and enabled them to enjoy everlasting happiness.” Noted Egyptologist Budge was the Keeper of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities in the British Museum; “among Egyptologists Budge was the best Semitic scholar of his generation” (DNB).

Tolkien had a firm grasp on the history of the two Egyptian kingdoms and their symbols. In a letter to Rhona Beare dated 14 October 1958, concerning questions (“What clothes did the peoples of Middle-earth wear? Was the winged crown of Gondor like that of a Valkyrie, or as depicted on a Gauloise cigarette packet?”) put to Tolkien for a gathering of Lord of the Rings enthusiasts, he wrote: “The Númenóreans of Gondor were proud, peculiar, and archaic, and I think are best pictured in (say) Egyptian terms. In many ways they resembled ‘Egyptians’—the love of, and power to construct, the gigantic and massive. And in their great interest in ancestry and in tombs…I think the crown of Gondor (the S. Kingdom) was very tall, like that of Egypt, but with wings attached, not set straight back but at an angle. The N. Kingdom had only a diadem (III 323). Cf. the difference between the N. and S. kingdoms of Egypt” (Letters, 281).

The similarities between Tolkien’s oeuvre and ancient Egyptian writings have been noted: “Egyptian authors were especially fond of embedding text fragments from one genre within a textual frame from a different genre… A more familiar example is the biblical book of Genesis, which embeds genealogy, myth, liturgy, song, poetry, onomasticon, history, folk tale, blessing formula, dream text testament, and novella within its two major frames of primeval history (chapters 1-11) and ancestral narrative (chapters 12-50). The same techniques can also be found in modern literary works, especially those which deliberately mimic ancient forms; a prominent example in modern English is J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings” (Black, Instruction of Amenemope, 147). First published in 1897.

Light wear to spine ends, light soiling to original cloth. A near-fine copy with an exceptional association.

Book of the Dead
Cost: $8,800.00

Source
Note: This is not an endorsement or advertisement for the dealer offering this book, merely a documentation of rare and interesting books in circulation.

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